The Frequency of Souls, 2012

This was taken outside Covent Garden tube station in London, UK.

The Frequency of Souls is a novel by Mary Kay Zuravleff. It was published in 1996.

I haven’t read this book, but Nikki has and raves about it (and she introduced me to the work of Margaret Atwood, so I trust her judgement). So, without further ado, here’s the skinny on this one:

George is about to be forced to re-evaluate everything in his life from love and family, to science itself. George is about to get a new office mate, Niagara Spence, with whom he will become obsessed. Niagara is on a quest for electrical evidence of life after death.

And here’s the first paragraph:

Ever since he had built his first radio set from glass tubes and a spool of lead, George Mahoney remained convinced that the universe was soldered together with logic. That, in essence, was his philosophy, though there were corollaries, too: all supernatural phenomena, including what passed for miracles, were explicable; the dead were no longer among us; stars contained no truths for our future and so on. This dogma had sustained him through such head trips as the Vietnam era, college during the early seventies, and sixteen years of marriage. Lately, however, in the slow afternoons when he was supposed to be advancing the cause of refrigerator design, George found himself watching his new office mate and reviewing his belief system.

In our house, the book can be found: dining room, left-hand bookshelves, third shelf down.

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Thanks to John and Deanne, who got me titling. Extra thanks to Deanne for  tag ideas. Ta too to Terry for sending me bookshelfwards in search of ideas, and to Richard at CK Ponderings for being a cool collaborator. A round-up of our last 5 collaborations will be published this Sunday on Richard’s blog. Please check it out!

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