Archives for category: Music

zzzounds ad 4David’s turn to review one of my records…

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My turn to review one of David Cook’s records…

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Zzzounds! 3

David Cook reviews one of my favourite albums…

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Hi all…

Zzzounds! Poster by Robb Mirsky

David Cook and I have decided to force each other to listen to albums…and then review them. And we’ve set up a blog to do it.

It’s called Zzzounds!. To read David’s first review, click on the poster…

the poster is by the brilliant Robb Mirsky – you can see more of his amazing work here: https://robbmirsky.com/

No More Shall We Part (I), 2012

No More Shall We Part (II), 2012

No More Shall We Part (III), 2012

No More Shall We Part  is an album by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. It was released in 2001.

This was the Bad Seeds’ eleventh album together and was recorded after a four-year hiatus (due to Nick recovering from this, that and the other thing), and showcases the band’s  instrumental prowess. The lyrics deal with Cave’s usual preoccupations (death, religion, relationship breakdowns, death) and, despite the dark humour, are startlingly emotive in places. If I had a ratings system for these things, I would give this album four dead flowers out of five.

Here’s And No More Shall We Part.

In our house this CD can be found: dining room, right-hand bookshelves, third shelf down.

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Thanks John and Deanne and Terry and to Richard at CK Ponderings. You know why.

Everything Must Go, 2012

Everything Must Go  is an album by Steely Dan. It was released in 2003.

I resisted the charms of Steely Dan until a couple of years ago (they’re just hideous 70s MOR shufflers aren’t they? I would think), then I fell for them. Sure, they’re tricksy – combining cynical, sardonic lyrics with smooth, jazzy grooves at every turn, but you’ve got to do something a lot to get it right, right? I won’t go on and on about the band – you either love them or hate them.

Here’s the title track.

In our house this CD can be found: dining room, right-hand bookshelves, second shelf down.

One From The Heart, 2012

One From The Heart  is a soundtrack album to a Francis Ford Coppola film, written by Tom Waits. The album features Tom Waits and Crystal Gayle. It was released in 1982.

Tom and Crystal sing solo and duet on this album, and their voices complement each other beautifully (this was pre-barking days for Tom, and his voice has a sweetness to it). The songs form a loose narrative, presumably mirroring the action in the film, but I wouldn’t know, I’ve never seen it. What drew me to the album was Tom, who I’ve followed since Swordfishtrombones. While I’m a huge fan of some of the recent albums, particularly Real Gone, the stuff I really love is the early, romantic stuff. One From The Heart does it for me, and it’s funny too.

Here’s Picking Up After You.

In our house this CD can be found: dining room, right-hand bookshelves, second shelf down.

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Thank you John and Denne for title and tag ideas etc. And to Terry for sending me to the shelves, and to Richard at CK Ponderings for being a super-cool collaborator.

Music For Airports (I), 2012

Music For Airports (II), 2012

Ambient 1: Music For Airports  is an album by Brian Eno. It was released in 1978.

This was a relatively late purchase for me – I got hooked on Eno when I heard his first three albums – they’re clever, funny, pop albums (my favourite has always been the overlooked one, Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy) (1974), (wherein Brian takes nonsensical lyrics to an extreme – Mother Whale Eyeless being as good a place to start as any). Anyway, Another Green World (1975), one of the other vocal albums featured instrumental miniatures, which were better than the songs, and through them I got into the ambient stuff. And thinking that one day I would be a great avant-garde composer (I was messing around with tape recorders a lot at the time), I devoured the lot, but somehow missed this one. It’s alright. It’s one of those albums that’s better as an idea than a listening experience. In fact, you’re not really supposed to listen to it in a “I’ll just sit down and listen to Ambient 1: Music For Airports” kind of way at all; you’re supposed to put it on and let it just be there in the background. I can no longer imagine a time when this would be of any use or even possible – it would have to be at deafening volume to be heard in our house.

There’s a really interesting article about the album here.

This CD can be found: dining room, left-hand bookshelves, third shelf down.

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Thank you, once again,  John and Denne for title and tag ideas etc. And to Terry for sending me in the direction of the shelves in search of inspiration, and of course, as always, to Richard at CK Ponderings for being a super-cool collaborator.

Untitled digital photograph, 2012

Untitled digital photograph, 2012

The first photograph was taken in Ashtead, Surrey and the second in the Horniman Museum, Forest Hill, London, UK.

The Horniman has a really interesting collection of objects (a large collection fo musical instruments, including exotic sound-makers such as femur trumpets) from around the world – brought back to Forest Hill by Frederick Horniman (heir to the biggest tea trading business in the world at the time). I like to think of him as a Victorian gentleman in the Phileas Fogg  mould. Anyway, the museum’s great – recently refurbished, with a new improved aquarium and well worth a visit if you’re in the area.