Archives for posts with tag: Abstract Art
Psst! (Pink), 2017

Psst! (Pink), 2017, acrylic paint and watercolour pencil on canvas, 80 x 80 cm

Another of my Psst! paintings – the second to be made. The recent paintings have had a lot less colour in them…more of which soon.

Ashley Lily Scarlett and I are engaged in a conversation in pictures called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out.

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And David Cook and I are reviewing each other’s record collections one disc at at time (very slowly). Check out Zzzounds!

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David and I have also just completed an online conversation about Jasper Johns and you can find all three parts at https://londoneyeball.wordpress.com/
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Painting for MES, 2018

Painting for MES, 2018, Acrylic paint and watercolour pencil on canvas, 80 x 80 cm

 

This painting is dedicated to Mark E Smith of The Fall. It was begun when he was ill and while I was working on it he died. There’s no real connection to Mark in either idea or execution (except of course that The Fall have been playing in the background since 1983 when a friend lent me Perverted By Language).

The only time I met MES was at a mini-gig at the HMV on Oxford Street in London to launch the album The Frenz Experiment. The group played a short set and then sat behind desks signing albums for the fans. Mark was friendly and polite (which was a surprise given that the music press portrayed him as a kind of fierce, cantankerous despot).

Over the years I’ve grown to love The Fall and Mark’s gnarled, dazzling poetry – from their first album, Live At The Witch Trials (1979) to their last New Facts Emerge (2017) there have been very few duds (although if you’re thinking of collecting their albums, steer clear of the live albums and compilations until you’re well and truly obsessed). And Mark E Smith went out as brilliant as he came in – the final album’s a stunning culmination, along with Sublingual Tablet (2015), of his work with Dave Spurr, Keiron Melling, Peter Greenway and Elena Poulou – a golden run of albums that started in 2008.

When I’m dead and gone
My vibrations will live on
In vibes not vinyl through the years
People will dance to my waves

Mark E Smith, Psykick Dancehall (thanks to The Annotated Fall)

If you are interested in learning more about The Fall a great place to start is The Fall Online Forum.

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I are engaged in a conversation in pictures called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out.

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Psst! (Brown), 2017

Psst! (Brown), 2017 Acrylic paint and watercolour pencil on canvas, 80 x 80 cm

Another Psst! painting. This one’s slightly different in that it includes some objects not found in the street: ship figureheads from a display at the Cutty Sark in Greenwich. The rest is the usual mix of discarded bags and bits of paper and paint marks photographed around London.

Figureheads at Cutty Sark

Scrape

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I are engaged in a conversation in pictures called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out.

* * *

David and I have also just completed an online conversation about Jasper Johns and you can find all three parts at https://londoneyeball.wordpress.com/
Psst! (Black), 2017

Psst! (Black), 2017
Acrylic and watercolour pencil on canvas
80 x 80 cm

Another of my Psst! paintings. Working on this prompted me to explore a predominantly monochrome palette, which I’m still doing…more soon.

Ashley Lily Scarlett and I are engaged in a conversation in pictures called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out.

* * *

And David Cook and I are reviewing each other’s record collections one disc at at time (very slowly). Check out Zzzounds!

* * *

David and I have also just completed an online conversation about Jasper Johns and you can find all three parts at https://londoneyeball.wordpress.com/

Psst! (Blue), 2017

Psst! (Blue), 2017

Acrylic and watercolour pencil on canvas

© Richard Guest, 2017

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Psst! (Orange), 2017

Psst! (Orange), 2017

Acrylic and watercolour pencil on canvas

© Richard Guest, 2017

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Psst! (White), 2017

Psst! (White), 2017

Acrylic and watercolour pencil on canvas

© Richard Guest, 2017

 

Three of six paintings from 2017 – they are all 80 x 80cm.

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I are engaged in a conversation in pictures called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out.

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And David Cook and I are reviewing each other’s record collections one disc at at time. Check out Zzzounds!

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Tensions (I), 2012

Tensions (II), 2012

Jean Hélion painted Tensions in 1932. According to Jean-Luc Daval, Hélion was “the sole French exponent of geometric abstraction”. To me the painting looks like High Modernism, and wouldn’t look out of place in a Mies Van Der Rohe building.

Anyway, Wikipedia has this to say: “[His] work of the 1930s established him as a leading modernist. His mid-career rejection of abstraction was followed by nearly five decades as a figurative painter. He was also the author of several books and an extensive body of critical writing.”

You can buy a  hand-painted reproduction of  Jean Hélion’s Tensions here.

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This is the last of my posts with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed nine collaborations. The latest can be seen a few posts back. Please check it out.

Wall-Relief, 2012

Sol LeWitt completed Wall-Relief in 1972.

Fittingly, for a proponent of minimalism, Sol LeWitt is hardly mentioned in History of Abstract Painting, and I can’t find a reproduction of the work online.

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My current posts (and photographs), bear titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

Thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who convinced me to title my works. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have just completed my ninth collaboration – it’s the post before last.

Anthropometry from the Blue Period (I), 2012

Anthropometry from the Blue Period (II), 2012

Anthropometry from the Blue Period (III), 2012

Anthropometry from the Blue Period (IV), 2012

Anthropometry from the Blue Period (V), 2012

Yves Klein produced Anthropometry from the Blue Period in 1960.

Around about that time he had this to say: “It is not enough to say or to write, I have gone beyond the concerns of art. You must have done it. For me, painting is no longer a function of the eye; it is a function of the only thing about ourselves that does not belong to us: our life.”

And Jean-Luc Daval adds: “The Anthropometries (prints made from the bodies of women covered in blue paint) were the means of emphasising the gulf between the work of art, in this case the monochrome, and life itself.”

You can see a reproduction of the work here.

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My current posts (and photographs), bear titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

Thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who helped me onto the path of titling my works. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. Number nine is imminent!

Flag, 2012

Jasper Johns painted Flag between 1954 and 1955.

Jean-Luc Daval’s a little sketchy on Jasper Johns,which is odd when you consider Johns’ importance in the history of painting. Perhaps he wasn’t in 1989 (but I’m pretty sure he was).

Anyway, Flag is the painting Jasper Johns is best known for. It’s a mixed media (encaustic, oil and collage on canvas) piece which uses the stars and stripes for its basic design. It doesn’t reproduce well in art books or on the web, but  it’s a very subtle work.

You can find a reproduction of the work here.

Wikipedia has this to say about his work: “Johns’ breakthrough move, which was to inform much later work by others, was to appropriate popular iconography for painting, thus allowing a set of familiar associations to answer the need for subject. Though the Abstract Expressionists disdained subject matter, it could be argued that in the end, they had simply changed subjects. Johns neutralized the subject, so that something like a pure painted surface could declare itself.”

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I’m doing a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog. Number nine is imminent!

Window, 2012

Robert Delaunay painted Window between 1912 and 1913.

According to Jean-Luc Daval, “Delaunay had moved so far beyond traditional perception that his painting, although it does not renounce figuration altogether, nevertheless has many of the attributes of abstract art.”

Delaunay has this to say: “Painting, then should have its procedures, its laws of expression. It is colour, which as Apollinaire wrote is the fruit of light, that is at the heart of the painter’s technical medium – and at the heart of his language. A painter thus works with the aid of physical elements which he must bend to his will in the whole.”

You can find a reproduction of the painting at The Other Paris.

Also, just a quick apology – I’ve been suffering some technical problems, so haven’t had a chance to answer emails, post stuff, or read your blogs. I’m tentatively optimistic that things are now better so I’ll be catching up with you all soon.

UPDATE: Argh! Intermittent isn’t in it! Sorry all.

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I’m doing a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog.