Archives for posts with tag: Abstract Art

Movement, 2012

Henri Michaux’s Movement (1950) is a drawing in Indian ink on paper. His work is not figurative, but suggestive of figuration, consisting mainly of groups of single or multiple downward brushstrokes in a single colour on a plain ground. He experimented with drugs as a creative tool and is famous for his Mescaline drawings. No link to the actual drawing in my book, but you get an idea from this interesting article here.

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I’m doing a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting (Art Data, 1989).

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog.

The Cathedral, 2012

Franz Kupka completed his oil painting, The Cathedral, in 1913. In his History of Abstract Painting, Jean-Luc Daval has this to say about Kupka’s work: “[In the early 1910s], the Czech painter Kupka was similarly pre0ccupied with the intrinsic nature of colour. Progressively liberating it from form, he arrived eventually at a “subjectless” painting. His starting point was purely naturalistic, but as he decomposed the image, reducing it step by step to coloured planes and rhythms, in which figurative references were dispersed in a dialogue of colour and pure form, so at last, without concious intention to do so, he found himself liberated of the concerns of representation.”

There’s a rather nice reproduction of Kupka’s painting here.

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I’m doing a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog.

Convergence, 2012

Convergence is a 1952 action painting by Jackson Pollock.

Pollock had this to say about his process of image making: “I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass and other foreign matter added. When i am in my painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing…I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, and so forth, because the painting has a life of it’s own.”

Harold Rosenberg had this to say about the action painters: “The painter no longer approached his easel with an image in mind, he went up to it with material in his hand to do something to that other piece of material in front of him. The image would be a result of this encounter.”

There’s an interesting take on the piece at Word Object.

And another completely different one courtesy of Kathryne Lewis.

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Without putting a time limit on it (because I know I won’t stick to it), I’m going to do a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting (Art Data, 1989).

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog. And there’s another on the way…

The Nightingale’s Song, 2012

The Nightingale’s Song is a 1929 collage by Oskar Schlemmer. It’s entirely abstract, with no suggestion of figuration and, as such, is not representative of what Schlemmer is famous for. The Nightingale’s Song features coloured rectangles arranged on a black background. They are suggestive of architecture (at night) in their arrangement. Sadly, I can’t find a reproduction of the collage online. If anyone can, I’d be grateful for a link.

Schlemmer’s most famous and reproduced works are paintings featuring abstracted human figures, and costume designs for the Triadic Ballet. He also designed the logo for the Bauhaus where he taught in the 1920s.

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Without putting a time limit on it (because I know I won’t stick to it), I’m going to do a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog.

Grey Forest, 2012

Grey Forest is a 1926 painting by Max Ernst. The painting is abstract, but suggestive of figuration. Ernst used a technique called grattage, which is scraping colour on a prepared ground set over an uneven surface, effectively a version of frottage (making a rubbing, much like a brass rubbing).

Max Ernst had this to say about the technique: “By adapting the process of frottage to the technical procedures of painting, although at first  it had seemed applicable only to drawing, while all the time trying to restrain my own active participation in the evolution of the picture so as to increase the active functioning of the hallucinatory faculties of the mind, I succeeded in being present as a spectator at the birth of all my works…Swimming blindly, I made myself see. I saw. And I was suprised to find I was in love with what I could see, and wanted to identify with it.”

You can see a picture of Grey Forest at Pam Thompson’s poetry blog here.

Without putting a time limit on it (because I know I won’t stick to it), I’m going to do a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I will be doing a collaborative post this Sunday on his site. Please check it out.