Archives for posts with tag: Abstract

Convergence, 2012

Convergence is a 1952 action painting by Jackson Pollock.

Pollock had this to say about his process of image making: “I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass and other foreign matter added. When i am in my painting, I’m not aware of what I’m doing…I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, and so forth, because the painting has a life of it’s own.”

Harold Rosenberg had this to say about the action painters: “The painter no longer approached his easel with an image in mind, he went up to it with material in his hand to do something to that other piece of material in front of him. The image would be a result of this encounter.”

There’s an interesting take on the piece at Word Object.

And another completely different one courtesy of Kathryne Lewis.

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Without putting a time limit on it (because I know I won’t stick to it), I’m going to do a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting (Art Data, 1989).

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator Richard over at CK Ponderings with whom I have completed eight collaborations. The latest can be seen on Richard’s blog. And there’s another on the way…

Bull Resting, 2012

Bull Resting is a 1913 painting by Franz Marc. The painting is not so much abstract as an abstraction – the bull is recognisable, as if seen through a stained glass window.

Marc was a member of The Blue Rider group, with Wassily Kandinsky. Franz Marc had this to say about the work of the group: “We have gone with a dowser’s twig  through the art of the past and the present. We have shown only art that lived unaffected by the constraints of convention. Our love and attention were directed to any kind of artistic expression that was born of itself, living by its own merits and not relying on the crutch of custom. Every time we discovered a crack in convention, we drew attention to it, because we wanted to discover the power that lay behind it, and which one day will come to light.”

You can see a picture of Bull Resting here.

Without putting a time limit on it (because I know I won’t stick to it), I’m going to do a few posts (and photographs), with titles taken from Jean-Luc Daval’s History of Abstract Painting.

As usual, thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator, Richard over at CK Ponderings – we’ve just completed our eighth collaboration – it’s over on Richard’s blog.