Archives for posts with tag: Digital Construct
Beautiful Future, 2015

Beautiful Future
Photography, digital manipulation
2015

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Beautiful Future (I), 2015– Beautiful Future (I), 2015 –

Beautiful Future (II), 2015– Beautiful Future (II), 2015 –

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Beautiful Future (III), 2015– Beautiful Future (III), 2015 –

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Central Hotel, 2015

Central Hotel
Photography, digital manipulation
2015

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Central Hotel (I), 2015– Central Hotel (I), 2015 –

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Central Hotel (II), 2015– Central Hotel (II), 2015 –

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Shadows and Light, 2012– Shadows and Light, 2012 –

Untitled (after the Death of Marat by David), 2015

Untitled (after the Death of Marat by David), 2015

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Untitled (after the Death of Marat by David) (I), 2015– Untitled (after the Death of Marat by David) (I) –

Untitled (after the Death of Marat by David) (II), 2015– Untitled (after the Death of Marat by David) (II), 2015 –

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Death of Marat by David

Death of Marat by Jacques-Louis David
1793
Oil on canvas
165 cm × 128 cm (65 in × 50 in)

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Untitled, 2015– Untitled (Regeneration), 2015 –

Whatever Happened To All The Fun In The World, 2015

– Whatever Happened To All The Fun In The World, 2015 –

WHTATFITW 01

Whatever Happened To All The Fun In The World (I), 2015– Whatever Happened To All The Fun In The World (I), 2015 –

WHTATFITW 02c

Whatever Happened To All The Fun In The World (II), 2015– Whatever Happened To All The Fun In The World (II), 2015 –

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The way you wear your hat/ I can ruin the world in pictures/ the way you sip your tea/ bring about apocalypse/ the memory of all that/ brush the dust off my hands/ no they can’t take that away from me/ and walk away

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The Set-up

Untitled, 2015

Untitled, 2015
Dan Parnell
Acrylic on Canvas Board

 

Untitled, 2015

Untitled, 2015
Dan Parnell
Acrylic on Canvas Board

 

L-R: Fake Blues, 2014; Blinding Light of Heaven, 2014; The Heart Knows Better, 2014

L-R: Fake Blues, 2014; Blinding Light of Heaven, 2014; The Heart Knows Better, 2014
Richard Guest
Digital Photography

 

In mid-July 2015, Dan Parnell and I exchanged the above works and challenged each other to change them, to turn them into something new. There were no rules as to how we would do this.

The process

Here’s a list of associations I made on first seeing Dan’s paintings: monochromatic, artist’s marks, suggestions of figure and landscape, monumentalism, rigidity, permanence, stone, carbon, earth tremors, St. Ives (Hepworth, Nicholson, Lanyon) and daylight on the coast. I think they also got slightly confused in my mind with a recent family trip to Rye and Hastings…the sum total of which meant something maritime was in the offing.

After photographing Dan’s paintings in the back garden, I worked on them in my usual way in Photoshop. So the physical paintings never changed (they are rather beautiful things and I’m glad they’re still around).

My current working method is to overload the picture plain with outside elements found and photographed in the street, (here: discarded carrier bags, spilt milk, cellophane wrapping, foil, paper takeaway bags, graffiti, scraped paintwork on the side of a van, cardboard packaging and a paper plate) and then gradually rearrange, delete and transform them until a new image forms.

To stop myself worrying about ruining Dan’s compositions, I added a layer of spilt milk to each of them, and ruined them. After that I felt much freer to add and subtract elements until the music started to play. I stopped once I felt I’d achieved a nice tension between the original image and the manipulations I’d made in response.

Here are a few shots of the intermediate stages of When The Boat Comes In I:

WTBCI 1a

WTBCI 1b

WTBCI 1c

WTBCI 1d

and II:

WTBCII 1a

WTBCII 1b

The final images are named after a popular BBC television series from the late 1970s. You can hear a glorious version of the theme song sung by Alex Glasgow here.

Reactions to Dan’s painting:

Bearing in mind we didn’t know what the other was doing there are a lot of parallels between Dan’s work and my own. The most obvious one is the maritime theme. Then there is the shared palette and the echoed shapes (the dinghy is very similar to the shape of the central bag in WTBCI I)…all very hive mind and a bit odd. Because I’m so familiar with the three images I gave Dan it was an odd sensation knowing that they lurked just below the surface – their meanings subsumed in his overall pattern.

I love the upbeat, anarchic image Dan has come up with – it’s a fascinating composition full of hot depths. And there has obviously been a violent struggle with the material – the imagery and colour remind me of Apocalypse Now. His paint marks and chemical attacks have smashed through the photographic images, lending them texture – simultaneously slowing them down and speeding them up. I liked the trace of his hand – lines I could never make, gestures I wouldn’t think of performing.

The use of (what I assume is), found imagery is interesting – it’s something I wouldn’t do at the moment. I used to do it a lot and this reminded me of the way it can open up an image to new associations. A nice bit of grit.

Final images

Launch time, 2015

Launch time, 2015
Parnell/ Guest
Acrylic and bleach on photographic prints

 

When The Boat Comes In (I), 2015

When The Boat Comes In (I), 2015
Guest/ Parnell
Acrylic on Canvas Board, Photography, Digital Manipulation

When The Boat Comes In (II), 2015

When The Boat Comes In (II), 2015
Guest/ Parnell
Acrylic on Canvas Board, Photography, Digital Manipulation

FIN

La Rossa, 2015

La Rossa, 2015
Street photography and digital manipulation

From the moment I started taking street shots in earnest, I wanted to see them next to abstract paintings. It seemed like it would make an interesting fit. Since then I have taken a lot of street shots and developed a more abstract way of working with the images I take. So it seemed natural to bring the two strands of what I do together. La Rossa is a work in progress, or rather an element of a larger work. Having taken the step of combining works I discovered what La Rossa is missing is another element: a tabletop sculpture…back to work.

La Rossa (I), 2015– La Rossa (I), 2015 –

La Rossa (II), 2015– La Rossa (II), 2015 –

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La Rossa is the third track on Van der Graaf Generator’s 1976 album, Still Life. You can listen to the song (9:54 of sonic heaven) here.

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Leon Hart, who has been a friend of TFIPM for a long time and been thrice captured in street portrait form, (the last time being here) has an exhibition of his paintings from the last two years coming up at the Leyden Gallery in London 24-28th November 2015. Leon’s work is great, so this is a must see.

Leon Hart Flyer 2

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And finally, Ashley Lily Scarlett and I are engaged in a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out!

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Garden II (sketch), 2015– Garden II (sketch), 2015 –

Thanks for all your good wishes – I’m feeling a lot better now. Here’s a sketch from Thursday night. All the photographs used were taken earlier in the week. More substantial stuff on the way…including another gallery visit with David Cook, a collaboration with Dan Parnell and some (yes, I’m going to use the term), diptyches I’ve been working on.

In the meantime you could visit Ashley Lily Scarlett and my dialogue in pictures, Between Scarlett and Guest. You can read/ eavesdrop on the conversation here. Or take a look at the project Barry Comer and I recently completed.

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Today’s post title is taken from the forth track on Peter Hammill’s 1974 album, The Silent Corner and the Empty Stage. You can listen to it here.

Untitled (Mutie #1), 2015

Untitled (Mutie #1), 2015, acrylic on paper, digital manipulation

 

During my break, (and as a result of working with Barry Comer (our project can be viewed here) and Dan Parnell (a post about our collaboration is coming soon) I began to wonder what it would be like doing my thing with one of my own paintings as a starting point. The answer is: very different from working with another person (and the anonymous others whose markings I photograph around London and use in my regular digital constructs).

While I like certain aspects of working this way, there’s a slight feeling of airlessness and claustrophobia about it (and I think I went for a wilder composition as a result). It’s kind of like when a recording artist plays every instrument on their latest album. Paul McCartney has done this, as has Prince, and most of Peter Hammill’s albums are made this way. Sometimes it works spectacularly, but on other occassions there’s something a little too “regular” or realised about a track. A fine line…I’m going to make some more.

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This post is named after the track Gog on Peter Hammill’s 1974 album, In Camera. It was his first to be almost entirely played by himself. Drumming is by the great Guy Evans. Backing vocals on one track by the great Chris Judge Smith.

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have started a blog called Between Scarlett and Guest. It’s a dialogue in pictures. You can read/ eavesdrop on the conversation here.

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Pink Steam, 2015– Pink Steam, 2015 –

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Wotcha!

So, it’s been a while…just so you know, the author has not (just) been sitting around on his generously proportioned (but perfectly formed) posterior. He’s also found time to work with other people (the fruits of the first project will be posted on Tuesday) on art works, exhibition criticism and computer programming. He’s even read a few books: Parkett #86 (2009) by various (technically a magazine, but, you know, a thick one), Electric Don Quixote: The Definitive Story Of Frank Zappa (2009) by Neil Slaven, The Dispossessed (1974) by Ursula Le Guin, Sculpture Today (2007) by Judith Collins, Anselm Kiefer (2013) by Matthew Biro and Akademie X: Lessons in Art + Life (2015) by various artists. Most exciting are the last two – nice to discover that a lot of the author’s assumptions about Kiefer’s motivations were incorrect – and that there is even more depth of feeling and poetry packed onto those canvases and constructions. Akademie X is what it says – an art school in book form – 36 artists and writers talk about creativity, their own practices and suggesting reading lists. The artist Carol Bove appears in both this book and Parkett – I was previously unfamiliar with her work – she’s incisive and brilliant – and I strongly urge you to check out her work.

Next on the pile is Imaginary Cities by Darran Anderson, which looks fascinating for all lovers of metropolitan areas. You can check out his blog here.

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This post is named after a song by Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band. It appears on Safe As Milk (1967).  You can listen to Electricity here. And because I love it so, you can listen to I’m Glad from the same album here.

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have a collaborative blog together. It’s a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out!

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You Scream / I Scream, 2015– You Scream / I Scream, 2015 –

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have started a new blog together. It’s a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest.

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