Archives for posts with tag: Location: DR4DL

Hotel World (I), 2012

Hotel World (II), 2012

Hotel World (III), 2012

These shots were taken on Kingsway, London, UK.

Hotel World  is a novel by Ali Smith. It was published in 2001.

Not that long ago, I started reading Hotel World but got waylaid and didn’t go back to it. That was a mistake that will soon be corrected.

Here’s what it says on the back of the book: “Five people: four are living, three are strangers, two are sisters, one is dead. Hotel World takes us through a night in the life of five people’s very different worlds. It’s luxurious for some, but a long drop for others. Cash or credit? Ali Smith’s innovative and extraordinary new novel checks us in to the smooth, plush world of the Global. But is it really the kind of place you want to spend the rest of your life in?…Forget about room service. This is a life-affirming book about death, a death-affirming book about life.”

Here’s the first paragraph and a bit:

Woooooooo-

h0000000 what a fall what a soar what a plummet what a dash into dark into light what a plunge what a glide thud crash what a drop what a rush what a swoop what a fright what a mad hushed skirl what a smash mush mash-up broke and gashed what a heart in my mouth what an end.

What a life.

What a time.

What I felt. Then. Gone.

In our house, this book can be found: dining room, left-hand bookshelves, fourth shelf down.

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RIP Huw Lloyd Langton

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Thank as always,  John and Deanne and Terry for title shenanigans and Richard at CK Ponderings for being a super-cool collaborator.

20 Fragments Of A Ravenous Youth, 2012

This was taken on Beckenham High Street, UK.

20 Fragments Of A Ravenous Youth  is a novel by Xiaolu Guo. It was published in 2008. In the original Chinese version, the book contained no punctuation and no divisions between sections.

On the back cover it says this (and I have no reason to disbelieve, because I haven’t read the book. Nikki says it’s great.): “Life as a film extra in Beijing might seem hard, but Fenfang won’t be defeated. She has travelled 1800 miles to seek her fortune in the city, and has no desire to return to the never-ending sweet potato fields back home. Determined to live a modern life, Fenfang works as a cleaner in the Young Pioneer’s movie theatre, falls in love with unsuitable men and keeps her kitchen cupboard stocked with UFO noodles. As Fenfang might say, ‘Heavenly Bastard in the Sky, isn’t it about time I got my lucky break?’

There’s a really interesting entry about Xiaolu Guo on Wikipedia. To summarise, she’s had nine books published since 1999, been the director or producer on nine films (including  How Is Your Fish Today? and Concrete Revolution) since 2003, and written two screenplays. I’m going to start reading her books.

Here’s the first paragraph and a bit:

My youth began when I was 21. At least, that’s when I decided it began. That was when I started to think that all those shiny things in life – some of them might possibly be for me.

If you think 21 sounds a bit late for youth to start, just think about the average dumb Chinese peasant, who leaps straight from childhood to middle age with nothing in between. If I was going to miss anything out, it was middle age. Be young or die. That was my plan.

In our house, this book can be found: dining room, left-hand bookshelves, fourth shelf down.

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Thank as always,  John and Deanne and Terry for title shenanigans and Richard at CK Ponderings for being a super-cool collaborator. The next is on Sunday.