Archives for posts with tag: Science Fiction

The Lathe of Heaven, 2012

The Lathe of Heaven is a novel by Ursula K. Le Guin. It was published in 1971, and was adapted for television twice, once in 1980 and again in 2002. I haven’t read this one, but c’mon the title, the title! In my defence, I loved the Earthsea Trilogy as a lad (but that’s a whole other genre).

According to Wikipedia The Lathe of Heaven is about a character whose dreams alter reality. Nikki says it’s brilliant – the first SF book she read that she liked. So there’s a recommendation.

* * *

Heh, heh, for the last “fortnight” I have been naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels. There’s a few more to come and then it’s out into the cold vacuum of space with no space-suit  for the lot of them.

As always thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings, who is naming his photographs after Dr. Who serials – great work going on over there.

I also highly recommend you visit Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods, Stevie Gill’s Killing Time With A Camera and J.E. Lattimer’s Arcane Arrangements. There’s a cool collaboration with J.E. two posts ago…

Advertisements

Millenium People (XI), 2012

Millenium People was J.G. Ballard’s penultimate novel. It was published in 2003. If you’re interested in learning a little more about J.G. Ballard, Bill Chance has written a great review of The Collected Short Stories here.

* * *

RIP Gore Vidal

* * *

For the time being I’m  naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

A big thank you to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings who is naming his posts after Dr. Who serials.

I also highly recommend Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods, Stevie Gill’s Killing Time With A Camera and J.E. Lattimer’s Arcane Arrangements. There’s a cool collaboration with J.E. in the previous post…

Millenium People (for and of Louis), 2012

Millenium People (for and of Cat), 2012

Covent Garden is just great for capturing extremely stylish people. Louis was at work. Cat had just finished work. They both look great! And it was so nice of them to pose for these photographs. I’m very grateful, and hope if either of you are looking at this that you like your photographs.

And as a little extra today, I bumped into some members of the Russian Olympic team. Sadly my Russian is non-existent, so I have no idea what their names are. Can anyone help me out?

Millenium People (for and of members of the Russian Olympic Fencing team: Nikolai Kovalev; Veniamin Reshetnikov; Pavel Bikov), 2012

Millenium People was J.G. Ballard’s penultimate novel. It was published in 2003. If you’re interested in learning a little more about J.G. Ballard, Bill Chance has written a great review of The Collected Short Stories here.

* * *

For the time being I’m  naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

A big thank you to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings who is naming his posts after Dr. Who serials.

I also highly recommend Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods and Stevie Gill’s Killing Time With A Camera.

Signal To Noise, 2012

Signal To Noise is a short story by Alastair Reynolds. It was published in 2006, as part of Zima Blue and Other Stories. It’s atypical of his writing in general in that it is set partly in a parallel world in roughly the present day. It’s a good read, but I prefer his space opera, for which he has rightly won many plaudits. I’ve been trying to work in a title from his Revelation Space series, but they’re tricky blighters to pin down. The series manages to be simultaneously very human and terrifically vast in scale, and features massive space-ships, cyborgs who are sniffy about travellers without “enhancements”, people who spend their whole lives sealed in moveable boxes, and some interesting spins on the psychological and emotional effects of space travel. Plus a universal steriliser that looks like a trumpet. I wish he’d written more…

* * *

For the next few days I will be naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

As always thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings, who is naming his photographs after Dr. Who serials – some great work over there already.

I also highly recommend Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, and Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods.

This is the seventh collaboration between Richard from CK Ponderings and I and for this one the theme was Steam. There were no other restrictions…

The Invisible Enemy by Richard Cooper-Knight

Richard Cooper-Knight:

The Invisible Enemy

This week’s collaboration turned out to be an interesting one. I had a pretty good idea of what I wanted, but after a couple of hours in a darkened room with a kettle that lights up when it’s boiling, I had to admit defeat. I took a different tack, and shut up in a warm and steamy bathroom I came up with some half-decent shots.

December1977 saw Tom Baker at the height of his Fourth Doctor powers and The Invisible Enemy on television. Accompanied by dad-friendly companion Leela, he battles an alien virus on one of Saturn’s planets. With a miniature Doctor clone injected into him to help fight the disease, he is helped, for the first time, by robot dog K9.

Perdido Street Station, 2012 by Richard Guest

Richard Guest:

As usual, I set the brief, then wondered why I’d made it so hard. Strangely, I did the reverse of what Richard did and wasted lots of time working in the bathroom. I’m not going to tell you how or where I took my image.

Perdido Street Station is China Miéville’s second novel. It was published in 2000 and is set in a world where magic (referred to in the book as ‘thaumaturgy’) and Victorian-era technology exist (in other words, this is a Steampunk novel). I’ve just started reading it, so despite it being utterly absorbing so far, I can’t recommend it yet. But maybe you don’t need that – the book regularly appears in best SF of all time polls.

Millenium People (IV), 2012

Millenium People (V), 2012

OK, so again I didn’t get these guys’ names, which is a real shame and very bad on my part (see also MP (III)). They were so nice to pose for these photographs and I’m really grateful. They are also incredibly snappy dressers! If either or both of you are out there, it would be great to hear from you.

Gurinder Singh just got in touch about his photograph in this post, which is great.

Millenium People was J.G. Ballard’s penultimate novel. It was published in 2003. If you’re interested in learning a little more about J.G. Ballard, Bill Chance has written a great review of The Collected Short Stories here.

* * *

For the time being I’m  naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

A big thank you to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings who is naming his posts after Dr. Who serials.

I also highly recommend Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, and Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods.

The Stars My Destination (I), 2012

The Stars My Destination (II), 2012

The Stars My Destination (III), 2012

The Stars My Destination (IV), 2012

The Stars My Destination (V), 2012

The Stars My Destinationis a novel by Alfred Bester, published in 1956. I haven’t read this one, but…it apparently contains “many of the staples of the later cyberpunk movement, for instance the megacorporations as powerful as governments, a dark overall vision of the future and the cybernetic enhancement of the body. Bester’s unique addition to this mix is the concept that human beings could learn to teleport, or “jaunte” from point to point.” Thank you Wikipedia. There’s more on the book here. I have read Bester’s The Demolished Man, and can recommend it as a ripping good read.

* * *

For the next “fortnight” I will be naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

As always thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings, who is naming his photographs after Dr. Who serials – some great work over there already.

I also recommend you visit Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, and Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods post haste, because they’re both brilliant.

Breakfast In The Ruins, 2012

Breakfast In The Ruins is a novel by Michael Moorcock, published in 1972. I haven’t read this one, but the title was dying to be used.

* * *

For the next “fortnight” I will be naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

As always thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings, who is naming his photographs after Dr. Who serials – some great work over there already.

I also highly recommend you visit Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, because it’s fantastic!! (and for her suggestion that we start a book club based on these posts). And you have to see Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods for no other reason than it is unique and brilliant (and in some ways fits in with the current SF theme on here).

Millenium People (III), 2012

Millenium People was J.G. Ballard’s penultimate novel. It was published in 2003. If you’re interested in learning a little more about J.G. Ballard, Bill Chance has written a great review of The Collected Short Stories here.

* * *

For the time being (it’s looking like it’s going to run for my version of a fortnight) I’m  naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels.

A big thank you to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings who is naming his posts after Dr. Who serials.

I also highly recommend Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods, and J.E. Lattimer’s Arcane Arrangements.

Swarm, 2012

In a further erosion of my rules for these posts, this one’s named after a short story by Bruce Sterling. It was first published in 1982 in Fantasy and Science Fiction magazine. My copy is part of superb anthology, The Oxford Book of Science Fiction Stories (edited by Tom Shippey). The story concerns a group of human space explorers undertaking a mission to understand and exploit a space-faring swarm intelligence. What could possibly go wrong? I thoroughly recommend reading the story to find out.

The Oxford Book of Science Fiction Stories spans the history of the science fiction story from 1903 (H.G. Wells’ The Land Ironclads) to 1990 (David Brin’s Piecework), without putting a foot wrong. Standouts for me are Swarm, The Screwfly Solution by Raccoona Sheldon and Crucifixus Etiam by Walter M. Miller Jr.

Bruce Sterling edited the anthology Mirror Shades which helped define the Cyberpunk genre. He went on to write The Difference Engine with William Gibson, which helped to bring about widespread awareness of another genre, Steampunk.

* * *

For the time being I’m  naming my posts and photographs after Science Fiction novels (and on this occasion a short story).

As always thanks to John Pindar and Deanne who set this whole titling thing in motion. And to my mirror-shade wearing collaborator and all-round cool dude, Richard over at CK Ponderings  who is naming his posts after Dr. Who serials.

Also highly recommended: Theodora Brack’s blog, People, Places and Bling, and Cheryl Moore’s Unbound Boxes Limping Gods.