Archives for posts with tag: Sonic Youth

Pink Steam, 2015– Pink Steam, 2015 –

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Wotcha!

So, it’s been a while…just so you know, the author has not (just) been sitting around on his generously proportioned (but perfectly formed) posterior. He’s also found time to work with other people (the fruits of the first project will be posted on Tuesday) on art works, exhibition criticism and computer programming. He’s even read a few books: Parkett #86 (2009) by various (technically a magazine, but, you know, a thick one), Electric Don Quixote: The Definitive Story Of Frank Zappa (2009) by Neil Slaven, The Dispossessed (1974) by Ursula Le Guin, Sculpture Today (2007) by Judith Collins, Anselm Kiefer (2013) by Matthew Biro and Akademie X: Lessons in Art + Life (2015) by various artists. Most exciting are the last two – nice to discover that a lot of the author’s assumptions about Kiefer’s motivations were incorrect – and that there is even more depth of feeling and poetry packed onto those canvases and constructions. Akademie X is what it says – an art school in book form – 36 artists and writers talk about creativity, their own practices and suggesting reading lists. The artist Carol Bove appears in both this book and Parkett – I was previously unfamiliar with her work – she’s incisive and brilliant – and I strongly urge you to check out her work.

Next on the pile is Imaginary Cities by Darran Anderson, which looks fascinating for all lovers of metropolitan areas. You can check out his blog here.

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This post is named after a song by Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band. It appears on Safe As Milk (1967).  You can listen to Electricity here. And because I love it so, you can listen to I’m Glad from the same album here.

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have a collaborative blog together. It’s a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest. Check it out!

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Disconnection Notice, 2015– Disconnection Notice, 2015 –

Today Yr Love, Tomorrow The World, 2015– Today Yr Love, Tomorrow The World, 2015 –

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have started a new blog together. It’s a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest.

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The Empty Page, 2015– The Empty Page, 2015 –

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 Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have started a new blog together. It’s a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest.

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Whatever it is, is the fault of the poor, 2014– Whatever it is, is the fault of the poor, 2015 –

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Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have started a new blog called Between Scarlett and Guest. It’s a dialogue in pictures. You can read/ eavesdrop on the conversation here.

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To read about my visit with David Cook to the recent Richard Serra exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery, click here.

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I Dreamed I Dream, 2015– I Dreamed, I Dream, 2015 –

Small Flowers Crack Concrete, 2015– Small Flowers Crack Concrete, 2015 –

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 Ashley Lily Scarlett and I have started a new blog together. It’s a conversation in pictures and it’s called Between Scarlett and Guest.

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Shadow of a Doubt, 2013

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 SONY DSCSignal to Noise #1, 2013

Set back from the lip of the opening was a metal-runged ladder that ran the depth of the shaft. The vertical tunnel terminated in a cool grey corridor of rough concrete. Anyone expecting to smell beer would have been disappointed. If anything the cellar smelt of mice and their doings. And something human.

“Come out,” he said to the empty corridor. From his standpoint he could make out a series of openings two to the right and the same to the left. “Come out,” he said again, with less conviction this time. His shirt stuck to his skin. A little way off to his left, a man coughed in a concrete room.

The words, “I’m unarmed,” echoed down the corridor carried by a voice Quinnell did not recognise. It sounded nothing like the man he and Sparks had found in the Guild Hall. Its accent came from several rungs higher up Bamtree’s social ladder.

“Well, I’ve got a gun,” said Quinnell. “Are you going to come out now?”

“Alright,” said the voice. The man appeared in the corridor. The vigour he had displayed in the chase replaced by a sullen shuffle. The dirty fingers of one hand were held aloft in a gesture of surrender. “I know you from somewhere,” said the man, nodding in Quinnell’s direction. The other hand clutched a wretched carrier bag to his chest.

“I want you to answer some questions,” said Quinnell.

“You’re a policeman?” said the man. He squinted and shuffled a little closer to Quinnell, sniffing all the while. “I’ve had enough police for one day,” he said. There was an extra sibilance when he said the word police. “Where’s your gun, then?” he added.

“There is no gun,” said Quinnell. “I’m impatient, I’m sorry.”

 

Signal to Noise #2, 2013

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Listen here to Signals by Brian Eno, the fourth track from his 1983 album, Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks. And here to Schizophrenia by Sonic Youth, the first song from their 1987 album, Sister.

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Disappearer, 2013

Ahem,

They found him in that little bit of time between sunset and dusk. He was still alive. But it was dark and M. Hergé and his colleague M. Goscinny had no medical training, so they assumed the worst. Besides, they were on a diplomatic visit from D_ville and had not expected murder to be part of the agenda.

The evening started promisingly enough. M Hergé and M. Goscinny were shown around the painting exhibition and introduced to Bamtree’s most important figures by the town’s mayor. But an hour after they arrived the mayor had been called away on urgent business, leaving the two men somewhat out of their depth in such parochially prestigious company. When the private view began to wind down and the guests were invited to explore the renovations going on in the rest of the Guild Hall, M Hergé and M. Goscinny were without a chaperone, and decided to take their leave. As Bamtree’s most important people made their way up the main staircase, M Goscinnyd made for the main door, but his attention was caught by what looked like an unusual piece of art deco sculpture down an ill-lit, ground floor corridor. On closer inspection, the sculpture proved to be a poor imitation. But just beyond it lay the gents toilets. M. Goscinny decided to pay a visit, while M Hergé waited outside. Switching on the light, Goscinny saw blood and cried out. M Hergé went to his colleague’s aid, and found he had stepped into the aftermath of a bloody pre-meditated killing.

Later, M. Goscinny would say, “We were not certain of protocols for this situation…” “Assuming there was no person with legal authority in the Guild Hall, we left the scene to seek assistance,” said M. Hergé. “To find a policeman,” said M. Goscinny.

“We had no idea finding that policeman would lead to such complications,” said M. Hergé.

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Disappearer is the seventh track on Sonic Youth’s 1990 album, Goo. The album was the band’s first release on a major label and their most accessible work. It is often unfavourably compared to their previous album, Daydream Nation, (lacking that albums panoramic sweep) but nevertheless contains a number of great alternative pop/ rock nuggets. Disappearer was released as a single in 1990. You can listen to it here.

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Kingsway is part of the A4200. It runs from High Holborn (in the London Borough of Camden) to the Aldwych (in the City of Westminster, and home of Bush House – the BBC’s old home). The road was formally opened in 1905 and linked the ancient routes The Strand and High Holborn. It’s 100 feet wide and a lot of slum dwellings were demolished to make way for it. They were replaced by mid-rise buildings in a neoclassical or neo-baroque style. We’re going to head north towards High Holborn…