Landscape study (051119), digital composite, dimensions variable, 2019

A couple more examples…in a break from using images of Dorset, the background of the second image is Croydon Road Recreation Ground in Beckenham (where David Bowie performed at the Beckenham Arts Lab Growth Summer Festival in 1969).

Abandoned Bandstand, digital construct, dimensions variable, 2019
Attempt, acrylic on canvas, 90 x 90 cm, 2019

For the next paintings I tried to move as far away from imagery as possible – where a shape suggested an object I painted it out, and waited for other shapes to suggest themselves. The idea was to make paintings which did not reference anything except the urge to make a mark and balance a colour composition.

The drawings followed a similar pattern.

And became a more regular output. For all sorts of reasons I needed to make smaller works and started thinking again about digital constructs…

Landscape study (241119), digital composite, dimensions variable, 2019

More in the next post…

Painting for Nikki, acrylic on canvas, 90 x 90 cm, 2019

So (following on from the last post), I abandoned the underlying image in my paintings and improvised. It was a very different approach – more about colour composition and instinct. Painting For Nikki was the first to be finished.

At the same time I pretty much abandoned the digital composites and started drawing…

Magic Hand, pencil on paper, 2019
Magic Hand II, pencil on paper, 2019

More in the next post…

That’s How We Do Things #1, acrylic paint and watercolour pencil on canvas, 80 x 80cm, 2019

Having got excited about improvising on Cowl (see last post), I went back to the above painting, which I’d shelved and applied the same method. You can see the original digital construct the painting was based on here. Less of the initial image survived.

In the digital construct for the next painting Fissure, I deliberately left areas of the image blank so I had somewhere to improvise, while retaining a the skeleton of a composition.

Sketch for Fissure, digital construct, dimensions variable, 2019

But once I started improvising the composition became less and less sustainable – it collapsed under the weight of the paint marks; the imagery was being buried…

Fissure, acrylic on canvas, 90 x 90cm, 2019

More in the next post…

Landscape study (201019)

In recent months my work has kind of gone full circle, so that I’m producing a lot of digital constructs again (as a way of thinking about possible paintings).

Visiting my parents in Dorset by train gave me the opportunity to snap the landscape and work in that format. It’s quite interesting to stretch out after working in squares.

Landscape (Stain), 2019

The painting being worked on in my last blog post about making stuff ended up looking like this…and underwent a name change…

Cowl, acrylic paint and watercolour pencil on canvas, 90 x 90 cm

…and the improvisational aspect of the process started to take precedence. The monochrome image suggested areas of colour, which led to the introduction of the vase shape and the snooker ball…

More on the paintings in the next post.

Here’s the second part of a conversation with David Cook about Pierre Huyghe and Walter de Maria…

London Eyeball

Screen Shot 2019-04-29 at 22.03.44 Pierre Huyghe Uumwelt (From the Serpentine Gallery Guide)

After a fairly long break Richard Guest and I visited two shows – Pierre Huyghe: UUmwelt at the Serpentine Gallery and Walter De Maria: Idea to Action to Object, at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill. This is the resulting email conversation, in two parts. You can read part I here

Richard:

Making a simple comparison between the two exhibitions, Huyghe is ceding his creativity to a machine, with the expected in/ un-human result, whereas de Maria’s work is not only driven by utopian ideas, but is all on a human scale – there are balls to pick up and drop, human interaction is imaginable (and encouraged in his drawings) and looks like it would have a satisfying tactility.

I’d like to see more work by Huyghe to get a better sense of where he’s coming from – is it all at this vast remove? The…

View original post 943 more words

David Cook and I have been to a couple of recent exhibitions. Click below to read part one…

London Eyeball

Walter de Maria at Gagosian Grosvenor Hill

After a fairly long break Richard Guest and I visited two shows – Pierre Huyghe: UUmwelt at the Serpentine Gallery and Walter De Maria: Idea to Action to Object, at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill. This is the resulting email conversation, in two parts.

___________________________________________________________________________________________

David:

Visiting these two shows was not any kind of programmatic choice – they aren’t related for me in any way. I think we both found the Huyghe show hard to digest; but, rather against expectations, the de Maria was quite playful in a laconic sort of way.

Walter de Maria is one of those artists who seem to embody the pioneering conceptualism of the 1960s and 70s. Rare pictures of him seem to give off both the romantic elan of early Surrealists and Dadaists but also the gravitas of the Los Alamos bomb makers and other highly serious types…

View original post 1,051 more words

Improvisation has begun on the painting I mentioned in this post.

Image transfer got to a point where I was satisfied and away we go…I’ve also been using improvised paper stencils to open up areas of the composition…more on this soon.

*


*

To see more please visit my website: https://richardguest.art/ or my Instagram account:
@richardguest9440

I’m currently working on this painting, which I’m toying with the idea of calling The Cacotopic Stain after a geographical area featured in a brilliant book by China Méiville entitled Iron Council.

The painting is based on a monochrome digital construct, which I’m transferring to canvas using acrylic paint and one paintbrush…

Once the image transfer is complete, I will improvise areas of colour and images on top. It’s a method I’ve adopted for the last couple of paintings. If you want to see more please visit my website: https://richardguest.art/ or my Instagram account:
@richardguest9440

It’s been a while, but last Friday I went out with the intention of taking some photographs in the street and dropping in on Tate Modern.

Whilst I’m always on the lookout for a potential portrait, most of my time is spent collecting images of splats, scuffs, drips and abandoned carrier bags to form the basis of a digital construct.

The following were all taken last Friday…

Solid fuel tank?
The Millenium Bridge from outside Tate Modern
Ocado waste

In Tate Modern, I decided to concentrate on paintings in the main displays. I’ve been familiar with The Three Dancers by Picasso for decades, but I’ve never really looked at the surface of the painting close up.

I found this area:

fascinating. I guess I’ve always thought of Picasso paintings springing into the world fully-formed, but he obviously had problems resolving this patch…

This was my first time seeing White Plane White, 1974 by Bram Bogart as well, but I’m glad I did…

White Plane White, 1974 by Bram Bogart

In one of the rooms housing a large sculpture, I found the following stain. It must have been quite a hardcore chemical to have bleached the stone floor like this. Anyway, I love it…

Stain
Stainscape
Sulba (I think)

The stain’s got me thinking…

*

To see more of my paintings, street portraits and digital constructs, please visit my website: https://richardguest.art/ or my Instagram account:
@richardguest9440